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A.S. Byatt and John Carey handed James Tait Black Memorial Prizes

23rd August 2010

Novelist A.S. Byatt and critic John Carey have been named as the winners of the 2010 James Tait Black Memorial Prizes.

Byatt won the GBP 10,000 fiction prize for The Children's Book, seeing off competition from a shortlist that included Strangers by Anita Brookner and Kazuo Ishiguro's Nocturnes.

Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel and Reif Larsen's The Selected Works of TS Spivet were the other titles in the running for the fiction award, which is the UK's oldest book prize.

'I am excited and delighted to win the James Tait Black Prize. It is a very distinguished and long-established award,' the novelist said.

After winning the GBP 10,000 biography category for William Golding, Carey commented: 'I'm enormously pleased and honoured to win a James Tait Black Prize.'

The other shortlisted biographies were Cheever by Blake Bailey, Martin Stannard's Muriel Spark, Different Drummer by Jann Parry and Robert Morrison's The English Opium Eater.

Last year, Irish writer Sebastian Barry won the James Tait Black Memorial Prizes fiction award for The Secret Scripture, while Michael Holroyd scooped the biography honour with A Strange Eventful History.
 

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