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Blood's a Rover among 2009's best crime novels

30th November 2009

Blood's a Rover by James Ellroy is one of the best crime novels of 2009, according to the Sunday Telegraph.

The broadsheet named the concluding part of Ellroy's Underworld USA trilogy as one of the highlights of the year for fans of the crime genre, along with David Peace's Occupied City, The Complaints by Ian Rankin and Gillian Flynn's Dark Places.

Blood's a Rover is described as a demanding read, but one of the year's most rewarding works of fiction.

Occupied City, based on a real-life mass poisoning in 1940s Tokyo, is another tough book to tackle but serves to 'illuminate a whole culture and period', which ultimately makes it worthwhile.

Those looking for a lighter read are pointed in the direction of The Complaints as it can be 'devoured in a sitting' and is so fast-paced that fans will hardly notice the absence of Rankin's most famous character, Rebus.

Finally, Dark Places is applauded by the newspaper for proving that 'writers of intelligent psychological thrillers can get their readers' hearts pumping at dangerous speeds without resorting to boiling or burying anybody'.

In a recent interview with the Minneapolis Star Tribune, Ellroy said that he wants to craft books which others do not have the stamina to write and revealed that he spends months researching each work in detail.

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