Close
Enter your search into one or more of the boxes below:
You can refine your search by selecting from any of the options below:
Search
Your Shopping Basket
Total number of items: 0
Sub total: £0.00
Go to Checkout
Our Birmingham Shop
Our Bristol Shop
Animators Survival Kit

Commonwealth Writers' Prize winners announced

23rd May 2011

The 2011 Commonwealth Writers' Prize winners have been announced, with Aminatta Forna's The Memory of Love scooping the coveted best book award after triumphing in the Africa regional category.

Craig Cliff's A Man Melting, which was victorious in the debut category in the south-east Asia and Pacific region, went on to win the overall best first book prize in the awards ceremony, held in Sydney, Australia.

Nicholas Hasluck, chair of the judging panel, said the winning books demonstrate the 'irreducible power of the written word' in a time of rapid global change and uncertainty.

'The standard of entries this year has been exceptional, showcasing work with strong insight, spirit and voice, introducing readers to unfamiliar worlds,' he added.

Other regional winners included Happiness is a Four-Letter Word by Cynthia Jele, which won the best first book prize in Africa, while Kim Scott's That Deadman Dance was named best novel in south-east Asia and the Pacific.

In the Caribbean and Canada, the best book award was won by Emma Donoghue's Room and best first book by Katrina Best's Bird Eat Bird.

The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet by David Mitchell won the best book award in south Asia and Europe, with Sabra Zoo by Mischa Hiller named best first book.

Latest Blog
#FoylesFave: Dunkirk
21/07/2017

This month history buffs and film fans are united as they eagerly await Christopher Nolan's portrayal of Dunkirk. Madga from our Birmingham branch reviews the accompanying book.

#FoylesFave: Theft by Finding
19/07/2017

Meg from our web team discusses her love for all things Sedaris as his first volume of diaries is published.

Marian Veevers on Why No Woman is Simply a Product of the Time in which She Lives
18/07/2017

On the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's death, Marian Veevers explains why no woman is simply a product of the time in which she lives.

View all Blog Entries
Twitter
Show/Hide Tweets
© W&G Foyle Ltd