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CWA unveils Crime Thriller Awards finalists

10th August 2010

The finalists for the Specsavers Crime Thriller Awards have been named by the Crime Writers' Association (CWA).

Competing in the CWA Gold Dagger award, which recognises the best crime novel of the year, are Blacklands by Belinda Bauer, S.J. Bolton's Blood Harvest, Shadowplay by Karen Campbell and George Pelecanos' The Way Home.

A Loyal Spy by Simon Conway, Scott Turow's Innocent, The Dying Light by Henry Porter and Don Winslow's The Gentlemen's Hour are the thriller novels contesting the Ian Fleming Steel Dagger honour.

Meanwhile, the debut novels in the running for the John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger were named as Ryan David Jahn's Acts of Violence, Rupture by Simon Lelic, William Ryan's The Holy Thief and The Pull of the Moon by Diane Janes.

The winners of the awards will be announced on October 8th at London's Grosvenor House Hotel, while the ceremony will be broadcast on ITV3 the following week.

Last year, the CWA Gold Dagger was won by William Brodrick for A Whispered Name, while The Last Child by John Hart was awarded the Steel Dagger and Johan Theorin's Echoes From The Dead took the John Creasey Dagger.
 

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