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Endless Forms wins William M. B. Berger Prize for British Art History

19th August 2010

The catalogue for the Fitzwilliam Museum's Endless Forms: Charles Darwin, Natural Science and the Visual Arts exhibition has won a prestigious award.

Endless Forms, which was edited by Diana Donald and Jane Munro, was named as the recipient of the 2009 William M. B. Berger Prize for British Art History.

It examines the links between the evolutionary theories of Charles Darwin and the art of the 19th century and was lauded by the Art Newspaper as 'well-argued and brilliantly illustrated'.

The exhibition it accompanied, which was held from June 16th to October 4th 2009, was the most popular the Cambridge-based museum has hosted to date, attracting more than 90,000 visitors.

Fitzwilliam Museum director Dr Timothy Potts said the exhibition was a 'huge success' with both the general public and the academic community.

'The catalogue is, if anything, even more important since it will be the vehicle through which the exhibition continues to have a lasting impact on scholarship,' he added.

Founded in 2001 by the Berger Collection Educational Trust and the British Art Journal, the William M. B. Berger Prize for British Art History includes a prize of GBP 5,000 and seeks to recognise the year's best art book, show or exhibition catalogue.
 

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