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Francis Alys show to open at Tate Modern

14th June 2010

An exhibition of works by celebrated modern artist Francis Alys will open at the Tate Modern in London tomorrow (June 15th).

The artist works in a range of media, including painting, video projection, animation and sculpture, and examines political themes such as economic crises and contentious borders.

His most famous piece, 2002's When Faith Moves Mountains, saw Alys organise a line of 500 Peruvian students, who walked over a sand dune while digging. They eventually moved the dune by a few centimetres, illustrating the power of communal action.

'Alys' work often starts with a simple act, either by him or others, which is then documented in a range of media. He creates interventions which frequently address a historical or political concern attached to a specific site,' the Tate explained.

The exhibition, which runs until September 5th, will showcase some of the iconic works by the artist, such as painting Le Temps du Sommeil, as well as newer pieces that have never before been seen in the UK, including video project Tornado 2000-10.

A Guardian preview of the show said that Alys' projects suggest that human endeavour is essentially 'futile' but people feel compelled to seek purpose in their efforts.

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