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History of King James Bible charted in new show

18th January 2011

The Cambridge University Library is to host a five-month exhibition on the development of the King James Bible.

Opening today, the Great and Manifold Blessings: The Making of the King James Bible event will display a number of artefacts linked to the history of one of the most influential books in the English language.

The show will feature examples of the source material used by the original Cambridge translators of the King James Bible in the 17th century, such as William Tyndale's pocket-sized editions of the text.

Furthermore, the exhibition will display a rare copy of the so-called Wicked Bible of 1631 - which has a misprint reading 'Thou shalt commit adultery' - as well as the first printed version of the holy book, the Gutenberg Bible of 1455.

Cambridge University Library's Emily Dourish added: 'The display not only traces the history of the English Bible translation which culminated in the King James Version, but also looks at its reception and use by its earliest readers.'

A King James Bible from 1611 is also featured in the British Library's current exhibition Evolving English: One Language, Many Voices, which charts the constant development of the English language from Anglo-Saxon runes to modern day rap lyrics.
 

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