Close
Enter your search into one or more of the boxes below:
You can refine your search by selecting from any of the options below:
Search
Your Shopping Basket
Total number of items: 0
Sub total: £0.00
Go to Checkout
A Year of Books
Account Services
Our Chelmsford shop
Our Birmingham Shop
Our Bristol Shop
Animators Survival Kit

Keep kids away from 'processed meat'

18th August 2009

Parents have been urged against putting processed meat such as ham in their child's pack lunches.

The World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) has warned that getting children into the habit of eating ham and salami could increase their risk of developing cancer in later life.

Estimates cited by the organisation suggest that around 3,700 bowel cancer cases could be prevented if everyone ate less than 70g of processed meat per week.

WCRF children's education manager Marni Craze explained that processed meat needs to viewed as an 'occasional treat if it is eaten at all'.

She said: 'We also need to do more to raise awareness of the issue, as a recent survey has shown that two thirds of people in Britain do not know that eating processed meat increases risk of cancer.

'This is despite the scientific evidence about a link being convincing.'

She said that deterring children from eating processed meat products will also improve overall health, which could be beneficial given the number of obese children in the UK.

Recent research by the WCRF suggested that regularly consuming high calorie coffee drinks could also increase the risk of developing cancer.

The organisation found that some iced coffee drinks contain around a quarter of a woman's daily recommended calories.

Latest Blog
Read an extract from Everything I Know About Love
20/04/2018

Dolly Alderton's Everything I Know About Love is an honest, funny and uplifting account of growing up and being enough.

An extract from The Fire This Time
18/04/2018

Edited by National Book Award-winning author Jesmyn Ward, The Fire This Time is a collection of essays and poems exploring black experience in modern-day America, in a response to James Baldwin's groundbreaking 1963 essay collection The Fire Next Time.

Swither, Shoogle, Wheesht - Kirsty Logan on the language of The Gloaming
17/04/2018

Kirsty Logan's second novel, The Gloaming, is a swirling tale threaded through with magic, heartbreak, love and mermaids. It is studded with evocative but perhaps unfamiliar words, adding atmosphere, mood and expression. Exclusively for Foyles, she has written about some of these Scottish words, that head up each chapter of the book.

View all Blog Entries
Twitter
Show/Hide Tweets
© W&G Foyle Ltd