Close
Enter your search into one or more of the boxes below:
You can refine your search by selecting from any of the options below:
Search
Your Shopping Basket
Total number of items: 0
Sub total: £0.00
Go to Checkout
Our Birmingham Shop
Our Bristol Shop
Animators Survival Kit

'Literary fingerprints' identified in study

10th December 2009

Researchers have developed a method to identify the 'literary fingerprints' of different writers, which could end disputes over authorship.

Scientists at Umea University studied works by Thomas Hardy, Herman Melville and D.H. Lawrence and created a formula which analyses individual writing styles.

The research, which is published in the New Journal of Physics, examined the pattern of new words used by different authors and found each writer has a unique word-frequency use.

In addition, the study showed the pattern of words used by each author depends on their education, vocabulary and personal preferences, labelled by the researchers as a 'meta book', and can be successfully identified by the formula.

'This meta book is an imaginary infinite book that gives a representation of the word-frequency characteristics of everything that a certain author could ever think of writing,' the experts explained.

Books studied in the research included Hardy's The Woodlanders and Jude the Obscure, Melville's Moby Dick and Israel Potter, and Lawrence's Women in Love and The Lost Girl.

In October, Sir Brian Vickers, a Shakespeare specialist at the University of London's Institute of English Studies, claimed the Bard worked with playwright Thomas Kyd on The Reign of King Edward III, after analysing the text with a computer programme.

Latest Blog
#FoylesFave: Dunkirk
21/07/2017

This month history buffs and film fans are united as they eagerly await Christopher Nolan's portrayal of Dunkirk. Madga from our Birmingham branch reviews the accompanying book.

#FoylesFave: Theft by Finding
19/07/2017

Meg from our web team discusses her love for all things Sedaris as his first volume of diaries is published.

Marian Veevers on Why No Woman is Simply a Product of the Time in which She Lives
18/07/2017

On the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's death, Marian Veevers explains why no woman is simply a product of the time in which she lives.

View all Blog Entries
Twitter
Show/Hide Tweets
© W&G Foyle Ltd