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National Gallery to display pupils' creative writing

1st September 2010

A unique exhibition at the National Gallery will see creative writing by London primary schoolchildren displayed to the public.

The Out of Art into Literacy show, which opens on September 13th and runs until December 5th, emerged from two projects by the gallery to encourage children to discuss and write about its paintings.

One of the initiatives - Into the Frame - made heavy use of Frank Cottrell Boyce's Framed, a children's book which features many National Gallery paintings in its plot. Boyce himself also worked with the 600 pupils and their teachers during the scheme.

The second project, Out of Art Into Storytelling, asked primary schoolchildren to tell their own versions of the scenes portrayed in artworks through role-play, dialogue and writing.

National Gallery head of schools Ali Mawle commented: 'Children look at National Gallery paintings differently now - with confidence and as a source of stories for them to tell. It has been amazing to see the passion that has been ignited.'

The gallery's current exhibition is entitled Close Examination: Fakes, Mistakes and Discoveries and looks at how scholarship and technology can determine the origins of Old Master paintings.

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