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Nature of work 'is rapidly evolving'

8th January 2010

The relationship between people and their work is evolving at such a pace that it could cause changes as big as those seen in the Industrial Revolution, according to one writer.

In an interview with the Huddersfield Daily Examiner, The Future of Work author Richard Donkin argued that changing technologies, living patterns and attitudes are transforming modern workplaces to the point that they are barely comparable to those of the last generation.

The 52-year-old, who covered the history of work in Blood, Sweat and Tears, pointed out that employment is rapidly moving from industry to knowledge-based work, while increased use of technology is blurring the lines between home and the office.

Donkin also told the newspaper that the ever-shifting evolution of work means people need to consider what drives them to pursue their particular career.

'There are obvious reasons like money of course, but why do we choose to go into certain jobs like journalism, which is relatively low paid?' he asked.

Will Hutton, author of The Writing on the Wall and executive vice chair of The Work Foundation, said that Blood, Sweat and Tears was both 'groundbreaking and universally admired' and claimed no-one is better suited than Donkin to predict the future of work.

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