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New Gormley work installed at Canterbury Cathedral

31st January 2011

Sculptor Antony Gormley has created a new artwork for Canterbury Cathedral by using iron nails taken from the building's repaired roof.

Transport, which is a two metre-long work crafted from antique iron nails to look like the outline of a floating body, has been installed above the first tomb of Archbishop Thomas Becket.

Gormley, who won the Turner Prize in 1994, claimed the new piece aims to reflect how people are 'temporary inhabitants of a body'.

'Through [the body], all impressions of the world come and from it all our acts, thoughts and feelings are communicated,' the Angel of the North artist continued.

The Very Rev Robert Willis, Dean of Canterbury, said he is 'hugely grateful' that Gormley has made the sculpture for the cathedral, adding that the piece is suggestive of how 'sacred spaces communicate a sense of time and eternity'.

Last year, Gormley worked on the National Galleries of Scotland-commissioned 6 Times installation, which sees six life-sized figures created by the sculptor posed in Edinburgh.

The project is the first time that works from the National Galleries of Scotland's collection will be permanently installed in the city of Edinburgh itself.
 

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