Close
Enter your search into one or more of the boxes below:
You can refine your search by selecting from any of the options below:
Search
Your Shopping Basket
Total number of items: 0
Sub total: £0.00
Go to Checkout
Our Birmingham Shop
Our Bristol Shop
Animators Survival Kit

Shakespeare's King Henry VIII 'not always popular with audiences'

17th May 2010

There are a number of reasons why William Shakespeare's King Henry VIII is rarely seen by modern audiences, according to one expert.

A new production of the play opened at Shakespeare's Globe in London this weekend, but the BBC noted it is one of the Bard's works which is often overlooked by theatres.

Professor Grace Ioppolo, a lecturer in Shakespeare at the University of Reading, told the broadcaster that King Henry VIII is perceived as 'jinxed', as during a production in June 1613 an accident caused the original Globe to be burnt to the ground.

She also claimed that the structure of the play could make it difficult for audiences to follow, explaining: 'Henry VIII is uneven - we don't know what genre it is. People walk into the theatre and ask if they are seeing a history play, a romance or a tragedy.'

In addition, Professor Ioppolo suggested that the absence of one-on-one duels and battle scenes can lead to a lack of interest from audiences, while some experts believe playwright John Fletcher contributed many of its 'creaky' scenes.

Earlier this year, Brean Hammond, a professor of modern English literature at the University of Nottingham, claimed that Double Falsehood, or the Distressed Lovers by 18th century scholar Lewis Theobald is based on Shakespeare's lost play Cardenio.

Latest Blog
Foyles' Find Your Way Through ... Depression
24/04/2017

How the tv series 13 Reasons Why and Prince Harry's revelations about his own mental health have both sparked important debates about teen wellbeing.

Meg Howrey on the Impossibility of Avoiding Science in Fiction
24/04/2017

As her new book, The Wanderers, is published, exclusively for Foyles, Meg Howrey discusses why all writers of contemporary fiction are going to have to deal with science, and the interesting things that happen between and beyond the categories.

Sara Paretsky Recalls a Childhood as the 'Town Giraffe' in Lawrence, Kansas
20/04/2017

As her new V I Warshawski novel, Fallout, is published, Sara Paretsky recalls her childhood in Lawrence, Kansas and how the town has provided the inspiration and setting for several of her novels, including Fallout.

View all Blog Entries
Twitter
Show/Hide Tweets
© W&G Foyle Ltd