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Tate Britain to show Clunie Reid and James Richards works

3rd September 2010

The works of Clunie Reid and James Richards will be exhibited at Tate Britain in the gallery's Art Now programme of contemporary displays.

For the show, which starts tomorrow (September 4th), London-based Reid has created a new installation of photo collages entitled Your Higher Plane Awaits, which uses glossy images that are overlaid with scrawled text.

Richards, on the other hand, will display Call and Bluff - a work that shows footage from a promotional video for lighting equipment on three screens opposite an edited sequence of shots from different films.

Tate Britain claimed that Reid and Richards' installations examine the 'immersive nature' of modern visual culture through manipulating images to show their full emotive potential.

'They weave together imagery from found sources including advertising, magazines, cinema and the internet and interject elements of the personal into otherwise banal material,' the gallery added.

Previous Art Now exhibitions at Tate Britain include the text-based poster prints of Janice Kerbel's Remarkable collection and Andy Holden's Return of the Pyramid Piece - which is a large knitted boulder presented with an accompanying film.
 

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