Hear No Evil

Hear No Evil

Fiction & Poetry, Modern & Contemporary Fiction
Paperback Published on: 02/02/2023
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Synopsis

Waterstones Scottish Book of the Month for February 2023

In the burgeoning industrial city of Glasgow in 1817 Jean Campbell - a young, Deaf woman - is witnessed throwing a child into the River Clyde from the Old Bridge.

No evidence is yielded from the river. Unable to communicate with their silent prisoner, the authorities move Jean to the decaying Edinburgh Tolbooth in order to prise the story from her. The High Court calls in Robert Kinniburgh, a talented teacher from the Deaf & Dumb Institution, in the hope that he will interpret for them and determine if Jean is fit for trial. If found guilty she faces one of two fates; death by hanging or incarceration in an insane asylum.

Through a process of trial and error, Robert and Jean manage to find a rudimentary way of communicating with each other. As Robert gains her trust, Jean confides in him, and Robert begins to uncover the truth, moving uneasily from interpreter to investigator, determined to clear her name before it is too late.

Based on a landmark case in Scottish legal history Hear No Evil is a richly atmospheric exploration of nineteenth-century Edinburgh and Glasgow at a time when progress was only on the horizon. A time that for some who were silenced could mean paying the greatest price.

  • Publisher: John Murray Press
  • ISBN: 9781529369113
  • Number of pages: 352
  • Weight: 240g
  • Dimensions: 194 x 128 x 26 mm

Customer Reviews

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Hear No Evil
Transported me to a time past
This book had me gripped from the first page. The author’s vivid descriptions of life in the teeming back streets of Glasgow made me feel I was there exper... READ MORE
Karen Sales
Hear No Evil
Excellent
A unique, complex and very well told story. A highlight of the last few years in Scottish fiction in my opinion.
Ross Sayers