Close
Enter your search into one or more of the boxes below:
You can refine your search by selecting from any of the options below:
Search
Your Shopping Basket
A Year of Books
Account Services

Where the Wild Things Are 'has a message for adults'

15th December 2009

Spike Jonze's adaptation of Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are seems to be aimed more at adults than children, according to one reviewer.

Writing in the Guardian, television producer David Cox pointed out that the production has been met with mixed reactions from film critics and producers, with some finding the adaptation of the children's classic puzzling.

However, he noted that the original book contains around just 200 words, meaning that Jonze had to add elements of his own to enable it to move over to the big screen.

Cox explained that the writer uses Sendak's tale to put across his own message that modern adults are encouraged to live their lives like spoilt children who can indulge all their desires regardless of the consequences.

'What Jonze and his co-writer Dave Eggers have managed to devise is an elaborately unfolding portrait of the folly of our age,' the reviewer wrote.

Commenting on the film in the Daily Telegraph, film critic Sukhdev Sandhu claimed that some elements of the screen version, such as its listlessness, are a 'betrayal of its source material's affirmatory spirit', but conceded that the film has received the approval of Sendak.

© W&G Foyle Ltd
Foyles uses cookies to help ensure your experience on our site is the best possible. Click here if you’d like to find out more about the types of cookies we use.
Accept and Close