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Signed Edition - Hamnet
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Signed Edition - Hamnet (Hardback)

£20.00
£16.99
15%
Usually despatched within 2 days.

Foyles Notes

Hamnet:  Waterstones group exclusive edition signed by the author with an exclusive essay.

Synopsis

'Immersive, at times shockingly intimate... ought to win prizes' Guardian


'A masterpiece. Historical fiction at its finest' Stacey Halls


TWO EXTRAORDINARY PEOPLE. A LOVE THAT DRAWS THEM TOGETHER. A LOSS THAT THREATENS TO TEAR THEM APART.


On a summer's day in 1596, a young girl in Stratford-upon-Avon takes to her bed with a fever. Her twin brother, Hamnet, searches everywhere for help. Why is nobody at home?


heir mother, Agnes, is over a mile away, in the garden where she grows medicinal herbs. Their father is working in London. Neither parent knows that one of the children will not survive the week.


Hamnet is a novel inspired by the son of a famous playwright. It is a story of the bond between twins, and of a marriage pushed to the brink by grief. It is also the story of a kestrel and its mistress; flea that boards a ship in Alexandria; and a glovemaker's son who flouts convention in pursuit of the woman he loves. Above all, it is a tender and unforgettable reimagining of a boy whose life has been all but forgotten, but whose name was given to one of the most celebrated plays ever written.



Fiction & PoetryHistorical FictionFiction & PoetryModern & contemporary fiction post c 1945 Publisher: Headline Publishing Group Publication Date: 31/03/2020 ISBN-13: 9781472273468  Details: Type: Hardback Format: Books
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More books by Maggie O'Farrell

Customer Reviews

I’m always a little wary about reviewing books as hyped as this one has been, and by authors as revered as Maggie O’Farrell. One wonders if the books, and indeed the authors, can ever live up to the advance accolades they receive, and whether, when the literary establishment is so in love with a novel or novelist, any positive review will be accepted at face value or perceived as just another acolyte toeing the party line. On the converse, would anyone dare post a negative review whilst anticipating the backlash that might ensue? After all, this book has been long listed for the Women’s Prize, a lot of people have rated it very highly. It might make one seriously consider whether just to keep one’s opinion to oneself. I have to admit that I am not a devotee on this author’s work, simply because I have never previously got around to reading it. I have two of her titles on my TBR, but in the past three years madding rush of blog tours, they have remained there, untouched. So maybe I am ideally positioned to come at this with an open mind and no preconceptions, which is exactly what I did. I also had no expectations with regard to how this would compare to her previous work, I could judge this book purely on its own merits. The author could not have foreseen when writing this book, which is a book she has said she has wanted to write for over thirty years, that it would arrive on the shelves at a time the world was being touched by a deadly pandemic, arousing in us the kind of fear and panic that is the mirrored in the family at the centre of the book, as they are touched in the same way by the plague in the sixteenth century. In fact, the vividness with which the author recreates this in the novel may strike too close to home for some to bear at this terrifying moment in this history. For others of us, what it manages to do is draw us close across the centuries to those who went before us and show us that, although much in the world has altered beyond recognition in those long, intervening years, human emotions of love, loss, grief, kinship, fear and fortitude are constant and unchanging. It allows us to relate to these long-dead people in a way we might otherwise be unable to do. Of course, this is largely down to the skill of the author in the writing. The everyday world of Stratford at this time is brought to life in such detail, and with such incisive and graphic description that complete immersion in the story in unavoidable. I was totally transported, living and breathing this experience along with the characters, completely caught up in the emotions and events to the point where I resented being pulled back out to face the everyday. I wanted to stay there, living and breathing and feeling this story until I finished it, harrowing and difficult as that was in parts, because it became so important to me to know how it ended. This is a very detailed book, full of languorous language, indulgent pacing and descriptions of the minutiae of life at this time. This is going to frustrate some readers, I know. We are used to life at a frenetic pace, we have no patience in the modern day. People’s attention span has been accustomed to sixty second sound bites, memes, instant fixes, instant gratification. We always want to move on, move on to the next thing, never satisfied. But life as we know it has stopped for a while. We have been forced to slow down, take a break, sit back and pause. Use this time to take in a book like this, when enjoying the language and indulgence of expression in this book to take you back to a time when life was slower, more considered and possibly more appreciative of the smaller, lesser pleasures, will pay off in spades with a deeper understanding of how people lived and worked and loved at that time. Allow yourself the space and time to feel the emotion that flows from the pages of this book and seeps in to your bones if you let it. Anyone coming to this book expecting the story of Shakespeare is going to be disappointed. In fact, the author never mentions his name once throughout. He is referred to as tutor, son, brother, father, husband, playwright, and this is very deliberate, because this is not his story. He is not centre stage, he is not the main protagonist, he is off in the wings, a bit player, the occasional character who wanders in and out of the scene, even to the end where is is the supporting role in his own play, not the titular character. This is the story of his wife. Anne Hathaway, known in this book as Agnes, as her father referred to her in his will, is the driving force in this novel. It is through her eyes that we see life in Stratford at this time, that we learn about the roles of the womenfolk who held the homes and families together as the men were away working and making the decisions. The heart of the story is in Stratford, where all the action takes place while Shakespeare is in London, and it is she who drives the plot, from the very first time they meet. She is portrayed as a remarkable woman with many skills that were underestimated by her peers, even treated with suspicion in some cases, skills of healing and understanding and uncanny intuition. She is also shown as possessing unbelievable strength of character, allowing her husband to leave her with two small children to go to London because she understands he needs to get away from the constraints of his family, the same family she is left to live within his absence, even though they are not her own. Maggie’s admiration for this unusual woman as she envisages her is apparent on every page. She uses her to show us intimate aspects of small town life in the sixteenth century and, more particularly, what life was like for women at that time. As a historical exploration, it is absolutely fascinating. The main thing that makes this book so special though, is the portrayal of parental grief on the loss of a child. This is something of which I have personal experience and the depth of understanding the author displays for the thoughts and emotions a parent experiences in these circumstances was profound. Her descriptions aroused in me memories that remain painfully vivid but oddly treasured, it is very difficult to explain how reading something this accurate both hurts and is deeply comforting at the same time. To be so understood, to have such pain acknowledged and explored, explained and transmitted to that fortunate part of society that has never felt it, is oddly consoling. There were scenes in this book that rang so completely true with me that it both broke my heart and gave me succour at the same time. The passage detailing the procession to the churchyard in particular was like reliving a scene from my own life, it made me cry but also provided solace in the form of understanding by another person of this pain. This is what great writing can do, it can make us feel understood, it can make us feel less alone in a confusing and frightening world. Many of us are going to need much more of this in days to come. I have waxed on at length in this review, I know, but I hope you have come to understand at the end why it is that I am telling you I have immeasurable love and appreciation for this book. Regardless of the hype, it has given me so much on so many different levels that I cannot praise it highly enough. As a historical text, as a celebration of the strength and fortitude of women, as an exploration and acknowledgement of grief and pain, of relationships between man and woman and parent and child, I adored every single thing about it. Every word, every feeling rewarded me beyond measure. It has moved me more profoundly than anything I have read in recent memory and I cannot recommend it highly enough. Read it, not because of who the author is, or because it is being feted high and low, or because it has been listed for prizes, but because it is a work of wonder and you deserve to give yourself the opportunity to experience it for yourself.

- 08/04/2020
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A boy in Stratford is looking for his mother, or anyone, really, because his sister is ill. He runs through his house, the workshop, the gardens, the street. So begins this desperately beautiful book. The word Shakespeare is never mentioned - William is always called the husband, the father, the brother. It is almost as if O’Farrell does not want to use the name, as if he could get in the way. The important people in this book are Agnes, the name used for Anne Hathaway, Judith, Susanna, the girls that live, John, Mary, his parents, Joan and Bartholmew, Agnes stepmother and brother. This is a book of the people that were important, the houses, the gardens that were the setting for a brief life and the effect of a boy’s brief life. This book is incredibly lyrical, moving and intensely written. It is packed with imagery, careful descriptions and love for a narrative that is completely absorbing. It has been a privilege to read and review this extraordinary book. The opening of this novel is memorable. It is like a long scene in a film, as a young boy runs from room to room, past the place where he played, through the workshop with a grandfather who he has been warned of, into a street where everyone seems to have disappeared. If it had been a straightforward story of a boy’s illness and death, it would have been harrowing. This book is far more subtle than that. The focus goes to a young man, forced to tutor a family of boys, who gets a glimpse of a young woman with a bird. The story of that young woman is then told, of a marriage with a strange girl which is almost a folk tale, which leads to the birth of Agnes, a woman with hidden depths and abilities. As is suitable for a novel which concerns a man with a huge imagination and ability with words, this book is full of images which suggest much, words about the plants and flowers that Agnes grows, collects and uses. The cures she uses for people who come to her, the herbs and plants that she tries to save her children with. It is elemental, describing birth and fear, love and torment. The alternating storylines work exceptionally well in this book; it is not an easy subject, and it is a novel with enormous ambition to take the few details known of Shakespeare’s only son and create a story which has so many themes. The complications of family relationships, the reason why Agnes was William’s choice, the implications of a child’s death. It includes a strange and unsettling chapter on the causation of this particular case of illness, which seems totally dissociated from the rest of the narrative, yet explains so much. This is a powerful book which is a monumental achievement even for an experienced author. In some ways it is a densely written book, full of images and little stories which shows enormous understanding of the time and setting. In other ways it is lightly written, handling the biggest of emotions strongly felt by vividly alive characters. This book is an achievement by any standards, and deserves to have a huge success.

- 04/04/2020
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