Comanche Moon

Comanche Moon

Fiction & Poetry, Modern & Contemporary Fiction
Paperback Published on: 12/02/2015
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Synopsis

The second book in the Lonesome Dove quartet, Comanche Moon, which follows on from Dead Man's Walk, follows ranchers Gus and Call in their bitter struggle to protect the advancing West frontier against the defiant Comanches, courageously determined to defend their territory and their way of life. It showcases Larry McMurtry's strong affinity for the landscape and its inhabitants with a deeply felt lyrical intensity.On the wild Texas frontier where barbarism and civilization come in many forms, Rangers Gus McCrae and Woodrow Call are pitched into the long, bitter, bloody fighting under the command of Captain Inish Scull.When Scull's favourite horse is stolen by the Comanches, he decides to track him down, leaving Gus and Call in charge. However, on their return to Austin, Gus is greeted by the news that his sweetheart is to marry another man and Call finds that the town's most notorious woman is desperate to settle down with him and become respectable. When Scull's wealthy wife demands that her errant husband be brought home, with feelings akin to relief the two men set off once more into the vast, untamed plains . . .Continue the series set in the American West with the Pulitzer Prize winning Lonesome Dove.

  • Publisher: Pan Macmillan
  • ISBN: 9781447274629
  • Number of pages: 688
  • Weight: 462g
  • Dimensions: 197 x 131 x 42 mm

Customer Reviews

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Comanche Moon
Last and definitely least
This is the fourth and final book I have read in McMurtry's 'Lonesome Dove' series.  And my least favourite.  It may be that I have become bored of the tal... READ MORE
Ian C
Comanche Moon
The Lonesome Dove saga comes full-circle
I have read this book and the rest of the Lonesome Dove saga four times in the last two years. Each book is distinct and there is an element of diminishing... READ MORE
Jack Lord